NYC Subway Tunnel Exploring

Below you will find an abbreviated listing of some of the hundreds of clandestine explorations we have made within the NYC subway system over the last 20 years. We carry on a tradition of exploring these tunnels that dates back to the first days of subway operation, and continued on by early formers and later, the graffiti artists who explored tunnels looking for lay up trains to bomb.

Many of the names and other identifying characteristics of these locations have been purposefully obscured for safety and security sake, while other well documented spots (such as the abandoned stations) are freely named.

The subway tunnels of NYC are a dark, dirty, often deadly place. We suggest that you do not enter these tunnels ( it is after all "illegal"), but if you find yourself compelled to, study these tunnels well before you make the jump off the platform. Ride the train and watch from the windows. Observe. Learn. Only through strict self guided education will you learn the ways of the subway tunnel exploring Jedi.

For a more complete guide to exploring NYC's subway tunnels, we humbly suggest picking up this book.

Of Dust and Tails: an abandoned subway tunnel from a forgotten era.

Under Chinatown, there’s a stretch of mostly disused subway tunnel unlike any other in NYC. It is relatively poorly documented, not appearing on any publicly available subways maps.



4 little known facts about the new Second Avenue Subway, and phase 2 budgeting

As the first phase of the second avenue subway finally opens, it is important to note a few interesting distinctions.



How can we use technology to help with subway station crowding?

Like most New Yorkers, I’ve noticed that subway stations are getting very crowded these days. As a UX designer, I wanted to take a closer look at this problem, and to strategize ways to address it.



James Connolly

“The day has passed for patching up the capitalist system; it must go.”



The ultimate gamble

A year ago, someone died on these tracks.